Related Publications

Defense Business Transformation

By: Jacques Gansler, William Lucyshyn

December 01, 2009

The Department of Defense (DoD) is the largest organization in the world, with operations that span a broad range of agencies, activities, and commands. With an annual budget over $500 billion, DoD employs millions of people that operate worldwide and maintains an inventory system that is an order of magnitude larger than any other in the world. However, the business systems used to manage these resources are outdated and inefficient. DoD relies on several thousand, non-integrated, and non-interoperable legacy systems, that are error prone, redundant, and do not provide the enterprise visibility necessary to make sound management decisions.

Defense Business Transformation

Implementing the U.S. Army’s Logistics Modernization Program

By: Jacques Gansler, William Lucyshyn

August 01, 2009

The first Gulf War of the early 1990s revealed the fundamental weaknesses of the Army’s outdated logistics information technology systems. In order to address these problems, the Army has undertaken an aggressive, multi-program effort aimed at adopting best business practices in a Single Army Logistics Enterprise (SALE). SALE represents the Army’s vision for its future logistics enterprise to be fully integrated and based upon collaborative planning, knowledge management, and best business practices (Rhodes 2005). The Logistics Modernization Program (LMP) is a key component of SALE.

Implementing the U.S. Army’s Logistics Modernization Program

Partnered Government: The Whole is Greater than the Sum of the Parts

By: Jacques Gansler, William Lucyshyn

January 01, 2010

The 21st century has ushered in a series of major challenges for our country. The list is staggering, and includes, most importantly, national security; but the other challenges are near equal in importance: health care, energy, environment, education, aging infrastructure, and the fiscal crisis, to name a few. Most, if not all, of these challenges are complex and largely open-ended. In order to respond to these challenges, federal agencies will need to create solutions, often in areas generally unfamiliar to public entities. As a result, federal agencies will need to partner with private and non-profit entities to develop and manage these solutions, and to provide the resultant services – with, of course, the government in the management and oversight role (as the ultimately responsible party, but with significant support from the private and non-profit sectors). Much of the government’s work is already done through this type of partnering.

Partnered Government